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Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ped Also -pede and -pedia.

Having feet of a given type or number.

[Latin pes, ped-, foot.]

Common examples are biped (Latin bi-, having two), an animal that uses only two legs for walking; quadruped (Latin quadru-, four), an animal with four feet, especially an ungulate mammal. Centipede (Latin centum, hundred) and millipede (Latin mille, thousand) refer to invertebrates with long segmented bodies and many legs, though not literally either a hundred or a thousand.

A few systematic names in zoology end in the Latin neuter plural -pedia: Pinnipedia (Latin pinna, wing, fin), an order of carnivorous aquatic mammals with flipper-like limbs which comprises the seals, sea lions, and walrus; Cirripedia (Latin cirrus, a curl, because of the form of the legs), a class of crustaceans that comprises the barnacles. (For another sense of -pedia, see -pedia.) The usual name for a member of these groups is respectively pinniped and either cirripede or cirriped.

A velocipede (Latin velox, veloc-, swift) was an early form of bicycle.

See also -pod.

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