Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-zoon Also -zoa, -zoan, and -zoic.

Types of animal.

[Greek zōion, animal.]

Examples of this ending include bryozoon (Greek bruon, moss), a group of sedentary aquatic invertebrates that comprises the moss animals; protozoon (Greek prōtos, first), a single-celled microscopic animal, such as an amoeba, ciliate, or sporozoan; spermatozoon (Greek sperma, spermat-, seed), the mature motile male sex cell of an animal, by which the ovum is fertilized.

A common plural for these is -zoa (bryozoa, spermatozoa); this ending also occurs in the taxonomic names for some groups of animals, of which examples include Anthozoa (Greek anthos, flower), a large class of sedentary marine coelenterates that includes the sea anemones and corals, and Hydrozoa (Greek hudōr, water), a class of coelenterates which includes hydras and Portuguese men-of-war.

Forms in -zoan are primarily adjectives, but can also act as nouns; as nouns, they are sometimes more common than the alternatives in -zoon: bryozoan, hydrozoan, protozoan.

Adjectives relating to these and other types of animal are formed using -zoic: cryptozoic (Greek kruptos, hidden), relating to small invertebrates living on the ground but hidden in the leaf litter, under stones or pieces of wood; also epizoic, hydrozoic, protozoic and others. For the names of geological periods in the same ending, see -zoic1.

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