Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-y3

A quality, state, action, or entity.

[Old French -ie, deriving from Latin -ia.]

Many common English nouns that were brought into the language from French in medieval times and later contain this ending. It is not an active word-forming element itself, but is often found in compound ones that are, such as -cracy or -graphy. Examples are blasphemy, courtesy, family, glory, honesty, jealousy, library, misery, navy, orthodoxy, society, story, subsidy, and victory. See also entries for other compound suffixes containing this form: -cy, -ance (for -ancy and -ency) (for -ancy and -ency), -ery, -gen (for -geny), -ity, -logy, -tomy, -ty1. See -ia for words that retain the Latin ending.

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