Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ville

A fictitious place indicating some quality.

[French ville, town.]

This suffix is of US origin, where many real place names end in -ville. Examples are usually used humorously and negatively: dullsville, the quintessentially dull provincial town, hence something or somewhere boring; nowheresville, an isolated place where there no prospect of success or opportunity for advancement, so a job or position with these qualities; pleasantville, the archetypal nice place to be (also the title of a film in 1998 and the name of several real towns in the US). The suffix is active, generating transient forms such as bribesville for a place where corruption is endemic. Sometimes words are given initial capitals, as though they were actual place names.

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