Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ship

Forming abstract nouns.

[Old English -scipe, -scype, related to shape.]

This ending is broadly applied and active in the language.

It can denote a quality, condition, or state: censorship, courtship, companionship, friendship, hardship, relationship, worship. It can signify status, office, rank, or honour: ambassadorship, citizenship, lordship, kingship; this sense overlaps somewhat with the idea of a period or tenure of office, or the office itself: chairmanship, dictatorship, directorship, headship, internship, partnership, professorship. A further group indicates a skill in a certain capacity: authorship, curatorship, entrepreneurship, musicianship; many terms with this meaning end in -manship. Some examples denote the collective individuals of a group: membership, readership (and the more recent viewership and listenership); however, township, originally indicating the inhabitants of a town, now usually refers to an area where people live. Other terms ending in ship are compounds of various senses of the word ship: airship, midships, trans-ship, warship.

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