Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-praxia Also -praxis and -practic.

Action; practice.

[Greek praxis, action.]

Apraxia (Greek a-, not or without) or dyspraxia (Greek dus-, bad or difficult) is inability to perform particular purposive actions, as a result of brain damage; neurapraxia is temporary loss of nerve function due to pressure on the nerve, often found in sports injuries; echopraxia is pathological imitation of the actions of another person; eupraxia (Greek eu, well) or orthopraxis (Greek orthos, straight, right) is correct practice or action, in a spiritual or ethical sense; parapraxis (sometimes parapraxia) (Greek para, beside, amiss, irregular) is the faulty performance of an intended action.

Adjectives based on these are formed in -practic: apractic, eupractic. A rare example of a noun in this ending is chiropractic (Greek kheir, hand), a system of complementary medicine based on the diagnosis and manipulative treatment of misalignments of the joints.

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