Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-opia

A visual disorder.

[Greek ōps, ōp-, eye, face.]

Examples include myopia (Greek muein, to shut), short-sightedness, whose opposite is hypermetropia (Greek huper, over, above, plus metron, measure) or hyperopia, long-sightedness; presbyopia (Greek presbus, old man) is long-sightedness caused by loss of elasticity of the lens of the eye, occurring typically in middle and old age; diplopia is the technical term for double vision. Several examples refer specifically to impairment of colour vision, as in protanopia Greek prōtos, first), insensitivity to red light; deuteranopia (Greek deuteros, second), insensitivity to green; tritanopia (Greek tritos, third), insensitivity to blue; these are named on the basis that red, green, and blue are respectively the first, second, and third primary colours.

See also -opsia, -topia.

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