Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ome

Having a specified nature.

[Greek -ōma, a noun ending denoting the result of an action.]

This is an Anglicized form of -oma and usually indicates some part of a plant having a given nature. Unlike that ending it indicates a normal part of the organism. A rhizome (Greek rhiza, root) is a continuously growing horizontal underground stem which puts out lateral shoots at intervals; a trichome (Greek trikhoun, cover with hair) is a small hair or other outgrowth from the epidermis of a plant; a phyllome (Greek phullon, leaf) is a part of a plant that is regarded as a modified leaf. In ecology, a biome (Greek bios, life) is a large naturally occurring community of flora and fauna occupying a major habitat.

However, genome, the complete set of genetic material present in a cell or organism, derives from a blend of gene and chromosome (Greek sōma, body). A couple of terms have been formed on its model: proteome, the complete set of proteins produced from the instructions coded in a cell's genetic material, and metabolome (from metabolism), the complete set of metabolic processes within a cell. These seem to have been created partly by blending and partly by analogy with the older sense of the ending.

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