Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

mal- Also male-.

Improperly; badly; wrongly.

[French mal, from Latin male, badly.]

Some words acquired via French include malady (Latin habitus, having as a condition); maladroit (French à droit, properly); maltreat (French maltraiter); and malcontent (French content, pleased).

Many terms have been formed on English stems, of which a few examples are malnourished, affected by a bad or insufficient diet; maladjusted, failing or unable to cope with the demands of a normal social environment; malfunction, a failure to function normally or satisfactorily; malpractice, improper, illegal, or negligent professional activity or treatment; malodorous, smelling very unpleasant.

Some early examples were spelled male-, though this is long defunct as an active ending: malediction (Latin dicere, to speak); malefactor (Latin facere, do); malevolent (Latin volent-, wishing).

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