Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-monas Also -monad.

Simple microorganisms.

[Greek monas, monad-, unit, from monos, alone.]

The ending appears in genus names, especially of bacteria, protozoa, and algae. Examples are Pseudomonas (Greek pseudēs, false), a genus of bacteria which occurs in soil and detritus, including a number that are pathogens of plants or animals; Chlamydomonas (Greek khlamus, khlamud-, cloak), a genus of common single-celled green algae which typically have two flagella for swimming, living in water and moist soil; Trichomonas (Greek thrix, trikho-, hair), a parasitic protozoan that infests the urogenital or digestive system. Terms for individual organisms may be formed using -monad (pseudomonad, trichomonad), though these are relatively uncommon.

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