Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

fasci(o)-

A bundle.

[Latin fascis, bundle; fascia, band.]

The name of the authoritarian governmental system fascism derives from the fasces (plural of fascis), a bundle of rods with a projecting axe blade, carried by a lictor in ancient Rome as a symbol of a magistrate's power. In anatomy, fascia has a specific sense of a thin sheath of fibrous tissue enclosing a muscle or other organ; linked words are fasciculation, a brief spontaneous contraction affecting a small number of muscle fibres, and fasciitis, inflammation of the fascia of a muscle or organ. A fascicle (or fascicule) can be a separately published instalment of a printed work or, in anatomy and biology, a bundle of structures, such as nerve or muscle fibres or conducting vessels in plants, for which an alternative term is fasciculus. Fascioliasis, infestation of a human or an animal with the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, derives from the related Latin fasciola, a small bandage.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.