Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

extra-

Outside; beyond.

[Latin extra, outside.]

Extraordinary comes from the Latin phrase extra ordinem, outside the normal course of events; an extramural course of study derives from Latin extra muros, outside the walls; extravagant from Latin vagari, wander; extraneous from extraneus, external; something extramarital occurs outside marriage, especially a sexual relationship.

Technical terms derived from the same source include extrapolate (extra- plus the second part of interpolate), to infer or estimate by extending or projecting known information; extraterrestrial, of or from outside the earth or its atmosphere (or a hypothetical or fictional being from outer space, especially an intelligent one); extravehicular, relating to work performed outside a spacecraft; extravasation (Latin vas, vessel), the escape of fluids from the vessels that naturally contain them.

A number of words contain Latin ex- instead, for example extract and extradition; see ex-1. The opposite is intra-.

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