Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

disco-

A disc; disc-shaped.

[Greek diskos, a disc.]

Words in this form are closely related to English disc (US disk) and discus, both of which entered the language through Latin. One group refers to gramophone records, such as discotheque (French discothèque, originally a record library, from which disco derives by abbreviation), discography, a descriptive catalogue of musical recordings, and discophile, a collector of records. The form appears in some names of organisms, such as discomycete (Greek mukēs, fungus), a member of a class of fungi that have a cup-shaped or disc-shaped fruiting body. Something discoid or discoidal is shaped like a disc.

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