Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

anthrac(o)- Also anthra-.

Coal or carbon; a carbuncle.

[Greek anthrax, coal.]

A hard type of coal is called anthracite, originally the Greek word for a type of gem; the chemical anthracene, a valuable raw material for making dyestuffs, was first obtained by distilling coal-tar. The plant diseases collectively called anthracnose, caused by a fungus, are so named because dark, sunken spots appear; anthrax, a severe infectious disease caused by a bacillus, causes carbuncles among other symptoms.

The shortened prefix anthra- denotes compounds obtained originally from coal-tar or related to anthracene: anthraquinone is a yellow crystalline compound used to make dyes; another dyestuff precursor is anthranilic acid, whose derivative methyl anthranilate gives foodstuffs a grape flavour and also appears in perfumes and aromatherapy oils.

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