Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ate1

Forming nouns.

[Old French -at or Latin -atus, -ata, -atum.]

One sense, usually derived from Latin originals, is that of an office, rank or position: doctorate, episcopate, baccalaureate (a university bachelor's degree). Others refer to place: a consulate is the place where the function of consul is carried out; a protectorate is a state protected or controlled by another. Some signify the office or territory of a ruler: sultanate, caliphate, vizierate.

The suffix can mark a group or collective body: electorate, mandarinate (often used for a group of powerful civil servants), rabbinate, senate, syndicate, triumvirate. Others describe a person who exercises some function: magistrate, advocate, candidate, curate, subordinate. A mandate, an official order or commission to do something, is from Latin mandatum, something commanded.

The suffix also indicates salts of acids whose names end in -ic, such as nitrate (a salt of nitric acid), carbonate (from carbonic acid), or acetate (from acetic acid). Compare -ite1. The related term hydrate refers to compounds containing chemically bound water. Several examples indicate the result of some chemical process: filtrate, precipitate, condensate, distillate.

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