Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ast Also -iast.

A person connected with a pursuit or activity.

[Greek nouns ending in -astēs, often from verbs in -azein.]

The most common example here is enthusiast (Greek enthousiastēs, a person inspired by a god). Others derived directly from Greek words include gymnast (Greek gumnastēs, trainer of athletes, from gumnazein, to exercise naked, the usual practice in classical Greece); pederast (Greek pais, paid-, boy); and iconoclast (Greek eikonoklastēs, breaker of images, from eikōn, image). Modern examples include cineaste (borrowed from French and retaining the French spelling) and ecdysiast (Greek ekdusis, shedding), a humorous term for a striptease performer.

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