Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ade

Denoting an action, its result, or something associated with it.

[From Portuguese, Provençal, or Spanish words ending in -ada, or Italian words ending in -ata, derived from the Latin -atus, made of.]

Words in -ade have usually come into English through French. The derivation is often less than obvious, as with barricade, from Spanish barrica for a barrel or cask, as barrels were often used to build barricades. Similarly, arcade, a covered passage with arches along one or both sides, is based on Latin arcus for a bow, in allusion to the curve of the arches. A cavalcade, a kind of procession, ultimately derives from Latin cavalcare, to ride. Lemonade is from French limonade; in imitation English has other names for drinks, such as cherryade, gingerade, limeade, and orangeade.

See also -ado and -cade.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.